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Welcome to Shipping Hell - Tracking Number: #yourehereforever


Rosie

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We need a shipping thread for people to cry in. I know there are some people here who don't know all the internet lingo, so here's what you need to know:

Sometime in fan culture, people were referring to (romantic) relationships between fictional characters and it got shorted to just 'ship.' Ship as a noun refers to the relationship (e.g. my first ship was Mulder and Scully from the X-Files). Ship as a verb refers to the act of supporting, liking, wanting to see a relationship happen (e.g. I totally ship Merlin and Arthur from BBC Merlin).

Since this is a Circle Time thread, we're talking about ships in our own work. So go forth and talk about the perfect (or terrible) love interest you've crafted for your protagonist. What's at the core of the relationship? What makes it compelling or fun or tragic? What's the dynamic between characters? Was it love at first sight? Or maybe their first encounter was a complete disaster? What do you like or dislike about actually writing the romance between the characters?

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  • 4 weeks later...

This is a past one for me, but I totally dug shipping Luke and Brigitta in The Summer of No Regrets. Especially since that book was kind of a guilty pleasure. I don't read romance, and it got classified as a romance. So while I loved doing all the philosophical and coming-of-age stuff in the book, the Luke/Brigitta thing was the most fun. I think what made it fun was the mystery--is he or is he not a movie star in hiding? And if he is, does that mean he's lying to her? If he's not, is she attracted to him or to the possibility he's famous? And what do each of those things mean to the relationship? It was especially fun writing their fights. (Wow, didn't realize that until now.) 

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  • 1 year later...

I'm an absolute sucker for slow burns and mutual pining romances (I am tormenting myself with my current project cause Darling's romance plots don't take off for a while). She has a sort of false start romance that falls apart relatively early on, but the (first) central romance is with Hal, a sentient clockwork man who works for a mercenary group and the one who handles any freelancers (like Darling) that his organization contracts with. The two of them work together frequently, cause even though Darling is terrible at following orders, she's very good at getting jobs done. Eventually they both just accept that they work as partners and Hal's not "in charge" in any meaningful way. My favorite thing about writing them is just how much they care about each other, how much they enjoy each other's company, and how the other manages to be the exact thing that terrifies them. Hal sees straight through Darling's mask of aloofness and barbs to her scared and lonely core, and he genuinely wants to help. Darling notices that Hal takes care of others to keep attention off himself, and decides she's going to figure out who he is, and is nosy and persistent enough to make it happen. This is of course what both of them needed even if they didn't know or want it.

They both have significant trauma from their previous marriages, which is part of why the burn is as slow as it is. When they meet neither of them are anywhere close to being ready for a serious partnership. They spend literally several years living together in a way that is suspiciously couple-like and yet stubbornly refuse to admit there's any romantic feelings there (they drive their friends absolutely nuts). Eventually some yet to be determined incident makes Darling have an "oh shit, maybe all my friends weren't wrong after all and maybe I do really want to kiss the toaster man" moment. And then cause she's the catalyst, she convinces Hal that it's time they left the comfort of their current relationship for the one they both really want, even if romance comes with some more risk. And this is the start, cause there's still a lot more work to do. Darling doesn't know how a healthy romantic relationship should work, cause she's never been exposed to one, and as much as Hal is willing to be there, he's also having identity crisis after identity crisis. But they're both committed, and at the end of the day, they're best friends and so they muddle through it.

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  • 1 month later...

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